Pinhole Contact Lenses?

In my search for new options in specialty contact lenses that could help post refractive surgery patients, I received some literature about this new one. It is called the Pinhole Contact Lens. I have heard about pinhole glasses but this is the first time I hear about pinhole contact lenses.

Breger Vision introduces PINHOLE CONTACT LENS

For the first time in contact lens history, a single vision lens is combined with a pinhole lens giving the pinhole effect resulting in an RGP bifocal that works with guaranteed success.
The pinhole effect keeps both bifocal powers in front of the pupil at all times for a simultaneous binocular bifocal that works without interruption from blinking or lens movement.
This is a new and revolutionary design that gives near distance and intermediate vision with binocularity and stereopsis. It is very easy to fit because 5 fitting procedures are eliminated: fitting the dominant eye, fitting the non dominant eye, fitting for translation, fitting for compromised powers and fitting for lid attachment

The pinhole aperture stop before the entrance pupil eliminates peripheral light rays and allows light rays to travel in straight lines through the pinhole lens. This creates the following effects to vision: aberrations attributed to peripheral light rays are eliminated; the blur circle is reduced in diameter, there is an increase in contrast sensitivity, the retinal image is improved the depth of field is greatly increased, intermediate vision is created.
The narrow aperture of the Pinhole lens does not restrict the field of vision because of its close proximity to the entrance pupil. There is no reduction in luminance. The Pinhole lens gives the patient utilization of full visual potential (as the vision demonstrated with a pinhole disc). There are no visual compromises, Pinhole gives maximum vision to each eye.
Pinhole eliminates ghosting, flare and blur where the cause is light scatter from junctions and mal-positioning of power zones. There is only one junction in Pinhole -- that between near and distance zones -- and that junction is invisible. Mal-positioning of power zones in the lens is absent by virtue of zone diameter sizes and minimal lens movement. Computer users require and get a greater depth of focus and patients having demands for extremely good acuity get it. The fitters job becomes lighter in absence of complex lens designs and improved fitting procedures

The pinhole lens was invented by Porta in the 16th Century to give depth of field to optical instruments. A pinhole lens in a camera has a depth of field where all objects in front of the camera are in focus. The principles of the pinhole lens have been extended into today's field of refractive procedures with the pinhole disc. A pinhole lens put into a contact lens works on the same principle of a pinhole camera. Pinhole lens in front of the entrance pupil acts as a camera aperture stop, narrowing a bundle of light rays, eliminating peripheral light rays and allowing straight line light rays to enter the eye, giving the pinhole effect -- everything in front of the pupil is in simultaneous focus.

The Pinhole contact lens is available in Paragon HDS 100 material and it is FDA approved for 7 days continued wear. It is also available in Boston XO material with a DK of 100 and UV blocker. For dry eyes it is available in the Innovision Hydro2 material, with a DK of 50 and a 5 degree wetting angle.
This lens is manufactured by Breger vision and has a patent pending
Original Post
Wanda,

This is a very interesting concept!

I am wondering if this sort of thing might help my enormous starbursts. I have the type that is NOT pupil size related, and they occur night and day, regardless of pupil size. I wonder if I could test this theory with pinhole glasses or something to see if it would work? Any ideas?

Now that I think more about it, it may not work for me. I am assuming it would kind of be like a polarized lens in effect. A polarized lens doesn't reduce my starbursts.
20/20,
unfortunately it seems that nothing can stop or even reduce daytime starbursts. The industry doesn't even acknowledge the validity of this complication, much less have any idea what is causing it. My theory is that this is the result of slight scatter caused by surface micro-roughness either of the ablated surface or flap. Unfortunately nobody seems concerned enough about this effect to actually determine its cause.
I have this complication but to only a small extent, however enough to severely disturb me as this is the one single lasik complication that the future seems to hold absolutely no promise of fixing or even helping. Please, I don't mean to be pessimistic or insensitive in saying this, but it seems tome anyway like this is the case. Perhaps a corneal transplant would restore daytime-starburst free vision, at the cost of severe irregular astigmatism though most often as well as severe disruption of the electrophysiology of the eye to an extent that makes lasik seem like a smack on the wrist. Who knows though.

What these pinhole lenses are good for though is of course pupil size-related visual effects. More practical for someone without irregular astigmatism but with poor night vision after lasik would be this configuration but in a soft lens with a somewhat larger aperture than a pinhole. I had a lens like this made and it helps night flare somewhat, i think it would be more effective if the aperture were slightly smaller, im not sure exactly what the diameter of the aperture is though.

I wonder if this company, Breger, makes their pinhole in a soft material, i would like to experiment with it just to further my research...

.....The Pinhole contact lens is available in Paragon HDS 100 material and it is FDA approved
for 7 days continued wear. It is also available in Boston XO material with a DK of 100 and UV blocker. For dry eyes it is available in the Innovision Hydro2 material, with a DK of 50 and a 5 degree wetting angle......

are all these materials RGP lenses? I assume so, but am not sure.
Splicesite,

Your following quote hits the nail on the head:

"I have this complication but to only a small extent, however enough to severely disturb me as this is the one single lasik complication that the future seems to hold absolutely no promise of fixing or even helping."

Unfortunately, I seem to be the only one who has a night time version of this so severe. For me, the spikes are in 360 degrees, 75 feet or more in length, from all light sources. And it is there during daylight as well, just not as bad.

Does the contact lens have only one pinhole? Or many? I was thinking if it had many, that perhaps directing the light straight into my pupil might reduce the explosion of light as it hits my cornea.

I believe they are all RGP, I think that is what I read in what Wanda posted.
The pin hole contact lenses sound like a miracle to me. With ghosting and loss of contrast, it seems like these lenses could be one of the lenses that could help me!

Wanda, where did you get your information online? Will you try these lenses yourself? Has anybody else ever heard of these lenses or tried them?

Leukomia.. what do you think about them? Have you heard about them?

Thanks!
These lenses sound like a miracle! With ghosting and loss of contrast, this was greatly improved when I looked through a pin hole!!

Wanda, where did you get your information online? Will you try these lenses yourself?

Leukomia , have you heard about these lenses and what is your opinion about them?

Thanks!
Hi, if anybody has tried pin hole contact lense, please let me know your result? Or would you or Wanda give me the information about the pin hole contact providers, I can try it if it isn't sky-rocketingly expensive.
Many Thanks!
quote:
Originally posted by 20/20_Hindsight:
Wanda,

This is a very interesting concept!

I am wondering if this sort of thing might help my enormous starbursts. I have the type that is NOT pupil size related, and they occur night and day, regardless of pupil size. I wonder if I could test this theory with pinhole glasses or something to see if it would work? Any ideas?

Now that I think more about it, it may not work for me. I am assuming it would kind of be like a polarized lens in effect. A polarized lens doesn't reduce my starbursts.


This is a very old topic, but maybe I have the same issue. Do your starburst eliminate when you open your eyes wider, or when you pull your eyelids away?

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