A few questions about my Relex SMILE recovery

Hello!

I had a SMILE operation at the beginning of August (2017).

My previous vision was a bit worse (I think a bit more myopia) than:

right: -2,25 sph, -1,75 cyl, 180°
left : -3,25 sph, -2,25 cyl, 5°

Now, at almost one month from surgery, my vision is:

right: +0,50 sph, -0,75 cyl, 5° = 1,0
left : +1,00 sph, -0,75 cyl, 0° = 1,0

I can't right now comfortably use screens, as my sight blurs after a while (10/20 minutes), so the optician prescribed me (temporary) eyeglasses.
The eye sensitivity is very good - I have no dry eyes (at least, I don't feel it), and even shortly after surgery, I had little; also, in my life, I've experienced dry eyes virtually only in expected conditions (eg. on days after sleeping little/bad).

I know that it's possible to draw conclusions only after three months, but I have a few questions while I wait:

1. is this a significantly suboptimal result? if so, is it possible to achieve such suboptimal result even with a careful surgery? in other words, what's the likelihood that the doctor committed a mistake, or just performed badly (either in the calculation, or during the surgery itself)?
2. is there anything that can affect my final outcome? For example, if I give more rest to my eyes, use eye drops, use the eyeglasses less, and so on? I'm a programmer, so not using screens is difficult.
3. I have significant sports activity, and at certain times I undergo diet cycles; everything is carefully calculated and verified - but it is still taxing. Is it better to avoid any dieting during the next two months?
4. Is there any (very) general expectation for what's going to happen in the next two months? I'm 36 years old and very healthy (as wrote, I have significant sport activity).

Thanks for the attention!
Original Post
quote:
Originally posted by storm1543:

I can't right now comfortably use screens, as my sight blurs after a while (10/20 minutes), so the optician prescribed me (temporary) eyeglasses.
The eye sensitivity is very good - I have no dry eyes (at least, I don't feel it), and even shortly after surgery, I had little; also, in my life, I've experienced dry eyes virtually only in expected conditions (eg. on days after sleeping little/bad).

I know that it's possible to draw conclusions only after three months, but I have a few questions while I wait:

[QUOTE]1. Is this a significantly suboptimal result? If so, is it possible to achieve such suboptimal result even with a careful surgery? in other words, what's the likelihood that the doctor committed a mistake, or just performed badly (either in the calculation, or during the surgery itself)?


No, you do not have a significantly suboptimal result. Yes, it is possible to achieve a suboptimal result even with a careful surgery and I doubt that your doctor committed a mistake. ALL current and past ablation refractive surgery techniques are PLASTIC SURGERY on your corneas. Living tissue is removed and otherwise re-arranged to achieve a new shape to provide the patient with something more desirable. As with all plastic surgery, the final result may not be 100% of what we had hoped.

quote:
2. is there anything that can affect my final outcome? For example, if I give more rest to my eyes, use eye drops, use the eyeglasses less, and so on? I'm a programmer, so not using screens is difficult.


No. And, specifically, using the "temporary glasses" you received will not negatively impact your outcome, no matter what someone else might tell you.

quote:
3. I have significant sports activity, and at certain times I undergo diet cycles; everything is carefully calculated and verified - but it is still taxing. Is it better to avoid any dieting during the next two months?


It is fine to pursue all those activities.

quote:
4. Is there any (very) general expectation for what's going to happen in the next two months? I'm 36 years old and very healthy (as wrote, I have significant sport activity).


I can answer that by making an analogy. Let's say you have been 5'9" tall (175cm) and at 36 years of age you underwent surgery to make you three inches taller (183cm). Think of muscles being stretched, the need to re-learn balance when walking and playing sports and having to adapt visually to objects being farther away from you. In other words, you have to learn to re-posture many of your activities. Similarly, refractive surgery requires a degree of re-posturing. For some patients the process may take longer than for someone else because we all have our own unique visual systems and adaptations. This is one of the unmeasurable aspects of refractive surgery, the individual's personal response to the procedures.

It will take time for your visual system to adapt. Use the "temporary glasses" you were given since you have a visually demanding occupation. But for your more physical activities, give it some time to see how well you adapt.
Thank you very much for your answer!

I do appreciate very informative answers, since I've found that the field has, in general, a very significant lack of transparency (I've been to several surgeons before undergoing surgery, and I've been quite disappointed).

Interestingly, in the few weeks after the original post (so, in the period around 1 and 1.5 months after surgery), the left eye improved by half dioptre.

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